Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Greene County Chapel Cemetery

Today's Walk Through the Tombstones is at Greene County Chapel Cemetery located at the Monroe County/Greene County line.  In fact, it would appear that part of the cemetery is in Monroe County just by looking at it.

We came across this cemetery while heading out to Fowler Pumpkin Farm for the day.  I hadn't made any plans to stop at any along the way, but we had time.


GPS Coordinates: 39.08722, -86.68324

This cemetery has approximately 774 interments.  I am not sure when the cemetery was established, as I have not yet found any records showing that information.  It is, however, a current cemetery with lots of space for future interments.

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Our first stop is at the grave of Martha Alexander.

Born: 1839
Died: 1909

She is listed on the same headstone as Asa B. Alexander.  I assume that he is her husband.

Born: 1833
Died: 1866








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Here is the grave of William B. Alexander.

Born: March 27, 1827
Died: April 27, 1896

He served in the Civil War in the 31st Regiment, Company H.  











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Now we stop at the grave of Reverend Malden Baker.

Born: September 21, 1802
Died: April 6, 1894

There was this small plaque on his headstone that says he was a United Methodist Minister.


"The third migration of settlers occurred in 1834 from Calvert County, Maryland. This party was led by the Reverend Malden and Eliza Cullenbaugh Baker, and included the families of Thomas and Nicea Greaves Breeden, William and Christiana Greaves Fowler, Moses and Drusilla Graves Whaley, Joseph and Sophia Jane Hall Whaley, Samuel Hite, Cleverly Day, and David Coster. This migration appears to be the direct result of a schism in the Methodist Church in the United States. In 1834, an open and incredibly heated disagreement split the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States between traditional Methodists Episcopals (who believed in a strong centralized conference in Baltimore, and a decidedly pro-slavery doctrine); and a group calling themselves Methodist Protestants (who protested a strong centralized conference in favor of a stronger lay representation in the governing of church affairs; and who were passionately anti-slavery). This schism over slavery was common throughout churches in the South at the time. Upon arrival in the free territory in Indiana, the group began holding religious services calling themselves the Calvert Society. From 1834 to 1839 the Calvert Society met throughout the community in their own homes and in the homes of friends and family members who had previously arrived from Maryland and North Carolina. Not until 1839 was the decision made to build a permanent structure. According to church records there was a debate as to whether to build the church in Stanford or 'on the hill' west of Stanford. The hill was chosen, and in 1839 Joseph Whaley and Allen Sparks deeded the property for the Church, and the first log church in the area was built. The Calvert Society, feeling they were on the 'right' side of the anti-slavery issue, kept the traditional name of the Methodist Church, calling it the Methodist Episcopal Church. The early history of the Maryland Ridge church includes a story of a group of ├ČIndians' who had been camped along White River near Bloomfield during the following winter. They had come to the Church during a terrible blizzard and asked to stay until the blizzard had passed in order to keep their families from freezing. This is important to note because while the Church was the first in the community and the area, it was not the first built in the county and other churches would have been closer, but the ├ČIndians' appeared to believe this church would take them in. Church records tell us that for three to four nights, the Indians stayed in the Church, and while the women and children slept behind blankets hung near the fireplace, the men, both Indians and settlers, stayed up drinking and dancing each night with one Indian staying awake and sober to watch over the group. Such was the reputation and the nature of the settlers of the Maryland Ridge community"  (source: The Freedom,Indiana, Facebook page)

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This is the grave of David Carpenter.

Born: December 30, 1793
Died: October 31, 1890

He was the son of Mathias Carpenter (1752-1835) and Elizabeth Miller Carpenter (1755-1835).  They are both buried in Welchs Cemetery, Warrensville, Ashe County, North Carolina.  

He had several siblings:
Frances Carpenter Weatherman Davis (1771-1842) - buried in Three Mile Creek Cemetery, Avery County, North Carolina.
Jacob Carpenter (1778-1857) - buried in Wise-Wiseman-Carpenter Family Cemetery, Avery County, North Carolina
Margaret Carpenter Miller (1784-1865) - buried in Welchs Cemetery, Ashe County, North Carolina.


He was married to Catherine May Carepenter (1792-1862).  Her name appears on the opposite side of the headstone at Greene County Chapel Cemetery in Stanford, Indiana.

I don't see any records showing that they had any children, but I imagine that they did.

He served in the War of 1812, but I am unsure of his militia or which state he served under.



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We now stop at the grave of Johnathon Carpenter.

Born: April 1, 1834
Died: December 28, 1905

He was married to Perlina J. Smith Carpenter (1839-1907).  Her name is listed under his on the headstone at Greene County Chapel Cemetery in Stanford, Green County, Indiana.

He served in the Civil War in the 145th Infantry Regiment, Company I.






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Here we have the grave of Nora and Dora Green.

Born: June 22, 1878
Died: June 22, 1878

They were the infant twin daughters of J.A. (?-?) & L.E. Green (?-?).  I am unsure of their names or where they are buried.










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This is the grave of Elizabeth Alexander Dobson.

Born: 1793
Died: April 13, 1860

She was the first wife of Hugh McWhorter Dobson (1792-1878).

They had at least three children:
Julia Ann Dobson Whaley (1816-1891) - buried in Workman Chapel Cemetery, Nodaway County, Missouri
Franklin Dobson (1827-1878)buried in Workman Chapel Cemetery, Nodaway County, Missouri
Henry Harvey Dobson (?-?) -  unknown




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We now stop at the grave of Hugh McWhorter Dobson.

Born: September 17, 1792
Died: October 13, 1879

He was the son of Henry Dobson (?-?) and Jane Unk (?-?).  I am unsure of where they are buried.

He was married twice.  His first wife was Elizabeth Alexander Dobson (1793-1860).  She is buried near him in Greene County Chapel Cemetery in Stanford, Indiana.

They had at least two children:
Julia Ann Dobson Whaley (1816-1891) - buried in Workman Chapel Cemetery, Nodaway County, Missouri
Franklin Dobson (1827-1878) - buried in Workman Chapel Cemetery, Nodaway County, Missouri
Henry Harvey Dobson (?-?) -  unknown

His second wife was Martha Jane Carmichael Harden (1847-1912).  They were married on May 5, 1870. She is buried in Walnut Grove Cemetery in Park, Greene County, Indiana.

They had one child:
William Franklin Dobson (1877-1959) - buried in Walnut Grove Cemetery, Greene County, Indiana.

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Here is the grave of Samuel H. Dobson.

Born: February 25, 1847
Died: November 28, 1848

I am unsure as to who he was the child of.












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Now we come to the grave of J.H. Eaton.

Born: August 18, 1841
Died: October 22, 1862

He is buried with his wife, Phebe C. Eaton.

Born: May 2, 1843
Died: September 21, 1904

He served in the Civil War Indiana Volunteer 145th Regiment in Company A as a Private.






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Here is the grave of Charley Fowler.

Born: January 28, 1877
Died: May 25, 1877

And below him is listed Harry Fowler.

Born: September 7, 1885
Died: December 21, 1887

It is assumed that they would have been brothers.


I am unsure who his parents would have been, but I believe that they had at least two other siblings:
Hughie Fowler (1875-1876) - buried in Greene County Chapel Cemetery, Greene County, Indiana
Lizzie B. Fowler (1872-1873) - buried in Greene County Chapel Cemetery, Greene County, Indiana.


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Here we have the grave of Patterson Fowler.

Born: May 28, 1841
Died: November 18, 1914

He was the son of William Fowler (1809-1892) and Christina Greeves Fowler (1808-1890).  They are buried in Breeden Cemetery in Monroe County, Indiana.

He had several siblings:
Elizabeth Ann Fowler Tague (1833-1898) - buried in Greene County Chapel Cemetery, Greene County, Indiana.
William Wallace Fowler (1838-1918) - buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Monroe County, Indiana.
Mary Isabelle Fowler Baker (1843-1900) - buried in Greene County Chapel Cemetery, Greene County, Indiana.
Jesse Fowler (1844-1910) - buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Monroe County, Indiana.

He was married to Susan Miranda Fowler.  Her name is listed below his on the headstone. 

Born: August 13, 1844, Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio
Died: August 1, 1918, Indiana

They had several children:
William Alexander Fowler (1833-1898) - buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Monroe County, Indiana
Eldora "Dora" Fowler Poole (1869-1948) - buried in Greene County Chapel Cemetery, Greene County. Indiana
Benjamin Frank Fowler (1874-1949) - buried in Greene County Chapel Cemetery, Greene County, Indiana.
Joseph Henry Fowler (1874-1889) - buried in Greene County Chapel Cemetery, Greene County, Indiana.

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Here is the grave of the Infant Crane.

Born: January 4, 1866
Died: January 4, 1866

She was the infant daughter of Reverend J.D. Crane (?-?) & M.A. Crane (?-?).  I am unsure of where they are buried.  The Crane family is listed as being one of the first family's from the Maryland Ridge Settlement.









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Here is the grave of Mary E. Connet.

Born: April 18, 1786
Died: August 4, 1821

The date on the headstone actually looks like 1871, though I can not be sure of this.











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Here we have the grave of James Lockard Umbarger.

Born: November 25, 1838
Died: December 16, 1862

He was the son of William Umbarger (?-?) and Mary Johnson Umbarger (1804-1897).  His mother is buried in Greene County Chapel Cemetery in Stanford, Indiana, but I am unsure as to where his father is buried.  As an interesting note, his mother, Mary Johnson Umbarger was the grandmother of the famous showman The Gentry Brothers.  There is a poster in the Fountain Square Mall in Bloomington, Indiana that depicts there circus.

He had at least one sibling, though I am sure that there were more:
Leander H. Umbarger (1841-1916) - buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Monroe County, Indiana.

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This is the grave of Abraham May.

Born: September 1, 1845
Died: February 8, 1863

He served in the Civil War in Company F of the 82nd Indiana Infantry Regiment.  











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Our final stop is at the grave of Sarah M. Ham Corlett.

Born: January 17, 1853
Died: February 1, 1878

She was the first wife of William H. Corlett, Jr. (1847-1912).  He is buried in Greene County Chapel Cemetery in Stanford, Indiana.  

I do not find any information that they had any children.







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I hope that you have enjoyed your walk through Greene County Chapel Cemetery.

Please visit the listing at Find-A-Grave.

If you have any questions, please let me know.
















Monday, October 17, 2016

Knights of Pythias Video Walking Tour

Welcome to today's Walk Through the Tombstones video walking tour!

It takes place at the Knights of Pythias Cemetery in Smithville, Indiana.  We have been here a couple of times already for photo walks, but this is our first video walk.   

Our first photo walk is here.  

Our second photo walk is here.



I hope you enjoy your Walk Through the Knights of Pythias Cemetery!

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